National Security Network

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Restore American Military Power

Military
Our military is second to none, but eight years of negligence, lack of accountability, and a reckless war in Iraq have left our ground forces facing shortfalls in both recruitment and readiness. Every service is out of balance and ill-prepared. We need a new strategy to give the military the tools it needs for the challenges we face today. And we need leadership that meets our obligations to the men and women who put their lives on the line.
Read the full paper: The Progressive Approach: The Military »

Military

Arab Spring and the Fall of Qaddafi

Report 20 October 2011
Information is still emerging about the apparent death this morning of Muammar Qaddafi and the last of his inner circle in Sirte.  What is clear is that Libyans are celebrating the departure of a tyrant who caused terror at home and abroad for decades.  Americans will also welcome the defeat of a man who killed and terrorized our citizens - a defeat which came without U.S. troops on the ground and by sharing the burden with our allies and partners who are more directly affected by the events on the ground.
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Military

NSN Cited by Agence France-Presse on the Defense Budget

News Agence France-Presse 11 October 2011
Military

Matching Resources with Interests: A Strategy to Guide the Defense Budget

Report 5 October 2011

The Department of Defense is charged with protecting the American people and defending our nation and our allies. Our Armed Forces are operating in a strategic environment that continues to evolve as geopolitical trends shift and the world becomes increasingly interconnected. Yet chief among the myriad of challenges we face in the 21st century is our economic security.

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Military

NSN Policy Paper: Matching Resources with Interests: A Strategy to Guide the Defense Budget

Press Release Washington, D.C. 5 October 2011
The Budget Control Act of 2011 is driving a focused budgetary review throughout the federal government, including the Department of Defense. Next week, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta will testify before the House Armed Services Committee, where he is expected to discuss the Pentagon's budget and describe elements of the department's upcoming strategy review. As lawmakers look for savings, they must also reevaluate our national security priorities, the way America conducts its business in the world and the role the military plays in accomplishing those objectives.
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