National Security Network

Energy

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Take Dramatic Action

Energy
Energy is a security issue. Oil has passed $100 a barrel, gas is approaching $4 a gallon, and American jobs and well-being are threatened. We need a comprehensive energy strategy to make our country, our livelihoods, and our environment more secure.  We have lost time over the last eight years – and we are more dependent on fossil fuels than ever – but we have the technology to start making changes, we have public calls for action, and we have ready partners in other nations.  The time for dramatic action is now.*
Read the full paper: The Progressive Approach: Energy »

Energy

Ignoring Climate Change Undercuts American Security

Report 3 June 2010
Yesterday, President Obama made an aggressive pitch for comprehensive energy and climate legislation.  With the ongoing disaster in the Gulf of Mexico from the BP oil spill as backdrop, the president said "If we refuse to take into account the full cost of our fossil fuel addiction - if we don't factor in the environmental costs and national security costs and true economic costs - we will have missed our best chance to seize a clean energy future."  Yet despite the urgency of the challenge that the president highlighted, which undermines America's security at home and abroad, and despite broad support from national security and military leaders, opponents of a clean energy future for the United States continue to delay, distract, and undermine attempts to address this issue.
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Energy

Enhancing American Power

Report 14 May 2010
This week Senators John Kerry (D-MA) and Joseph Lieberman (I-CT) introduced the American Power Act to the Senate.  This climate and energy bill -which has taken into account the interests of a wide range of actors including moderate democrats, republicans and the business community -will reduce oil use, cut carbon pollution, invest in efficiency and clean energy technologies, and create jobs.  The American Power Act is an important step in the right direction to address the twin challenges of climate change and energy security.  It is essential to address these separate, but intertwined, challenges that affect the full realm of American security.  Yet conservatives blindly oppose the legislation, ignoring the threats to national security and power resulting from lack of action on addressing climate change and energy insecurity.  It is time for America to act and work to bolster American security.
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Energy

On Energy and Climate, the Military Acts While Conservatives Obstruct

Report 21 April 2010
Yesterday, the Pew Project on National Security, Energy, and Climate Change, along with former Sen. John Warner (R-VA) released a report on the military's efforts to address the challenges of climate change and energy security.  The military has recognized climate change and energy security as serious national security challenges that need to addressed, and has been a leader in efforts to adapt to these challenges.  As the director of the project said, the military "is doing more than sounding an alarm; it has enacted energy goals and is inventing, testing and deploying new technologies and alternative fuels to meet those goals. The military is, in many respects, leading the way and helping to reenergize America's future."  In addition to the military's recognition of the challenges ahead, bipartisan support to address energy and climate issues in order to better protect America also exists.  Yet despite the advice and efforts of military and national security leaders outlined in the Pew report, extreme conservatives continue to play politics and ignore the serious consequences posed by climate change and energy insecurity.
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Energy

National Security is Not a Bunch of Hot Air

Report 15 March 2010
This weekend, Carly Fiorina, the former Hewlett Packard CEO who is running for the Republican nomination in California's Senate race, mocked the incumbent, Senator Barbara Boxer for saying that climate change is a "very important national security threat"  -- by portraying her as a zeppelin flying over California.  While Fiorina may not agree with Senator Boxer, America's top national security experts and institutions do.  The Pentagon, the CIA, military leaders, and bipartisan leaders in the Senate - as well as Hewlett Packard, the company Fiorina led -agree that climate change and energy security are serious threats.
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Energy

Security More Important Than Politics on Climate and Energy

Report 9 March 2010

Today President Obama is meeting with a bipartisan group of Senators to discuss the issue of climate change and energy legislation.  Not only is comprehensive legislation essential to creating millions of American jobs and transitioning us towards a new clean energy economy, but bipartisan national security experts also agree that it is a critical national security priority. Such a move by the United States Congress is important for there to be sustainable progress - both domestically and internationally - on carbon reduction.  While such legislation would address many of the security concerns expressed by our nation's military and national security experts, extreme conservatives continue to ignore the warnings about this threat and instead insist on "doing nothing."  This is not how America will address the twin challenge of climate change and energy security.

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Energy

The Moment has Arrived for the U.S. to Lead on Climate Change

Report 17 December 2009
Tomorrow, President Obama arrives in Copenhagen for the final day of the U.N. conference on climate change. This is the decisive moment of the conference, one which will determine whether a global agreement to address this issue will or will not be achieved. The President’s arrival has been highly anticipated throughout the conference, and he is arriving after two weeks of intense negotiations over some of the most complex issues facing the world. Prominent American governmental leaders, such as Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Senator John Kerry (D-MA), and Senator Lindsey Graham (R-SC), have been working hard both in Copenhagen and the halls of Congress to find a political agreement that will address the threat from climate change.
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Energy

As Summit on Climate Change Begins, Conservatives Deny Security Threat

Report 7 December 2009
Today is the start of the two week United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen. From now until December 18, negotiators from 190 countries will be working out some of the most complicated and vexing issues surrounding a climate change deal, including cutting greenhouse gas emissions and financial commitments to help developing countries who are ill equipped to deal with the problem. Expectations now center on Copenhagen producing a framework political agreement, with binding targets to come next year.
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Energy

On Climate Change, Conservatives Continue to Put Politics and Ideology Ahead of Our Security

Report 3 November 2009
Despite conservative efforts to kill the debate, crucial climate legislation is moving forward today in the Senate Energy and Public Works Committee. The Clean Energy Jobs and American Power Act will not only strengthen America’s economy by adding jobs and modernizing our industrial base, it will also go far in mitigating the perilous effects that climate change poses to our country’s national security. National security experts, retired military officials, our intelligence community, and many prominent conservatives are in agreement that a rapidly changing climate has a direct impact on our way of life, global stability, and our security as a nation. To prevent these detrimental and preventable impacts to our national security, we need immediate action in the Senate to mitigate the causes and effects of climate change.
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Energy

Weather May Vary, But Need for Climate Action Remains as Copenhagen Approaches

Report 23 October 2009
National security experts, retired military officials, and many prominent conservatives are in agreement that the challenge of climate change poses a threat to our way of life, global order, and our security. After eight years of denial and dithering by President Bush, the Obama administration has broad public support for its efforts to revive international climate negotiations. The Obama administration is seeking to make progress on climate change at the Copenhagen talks in December and is also working to increase coordination and collaboration with China on a range of strategic and practical environmental issues. However, for Copenhagen to serve as the launching point for developing a comprehensive and implementable climate change treaty, the United States must lead by example.
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