National Security Network

europe

europe

Diplomacy

From Europe to the World: A 21st Century Transatlantic Relationship

Report 24 May 2011
President Obama's Europe visit this week highlights the continued importance of NATO, the most successful military alliance in history; the economic relationships that will be on display at the G8 in France; and the broader transatlantic relationship, equally important in today's turbulent environment.  The Obama administration has strengthened many of these important relationships while working to improve security on the continent. Long-standing concerns - Afghanistan, Middle East peace, Iran - join the Arab Spring and other emerging issues as key places for meaningful cooperation and burden-sharing with our allies and partners.
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Diplomacy

The Lisbon Summits

Report 19 November 2010

This weekend President Obama is in Lisbon for a series of crucial international summits with NATO, NATO-Russia and the European Union.  These transatlantic meetings will have a direct bearing on American national security, specifically as it relates to Afghanistan, Iran, nuclear weapons, missile defense, Russia and overall NATO strategy.  Despite positive momentum leading into these meetings, as symbolized by the U.S.-Russia "reset," which restored relations from their post-Cold War nadir in 2008, new strains are emerging, particularly those being caused by partisan politics in the U.S. Senate.  Specifically, while the president is abroad pursuing America's interests, those playing politics at home are actively attempting to undermine them.  As the Washington Post reports this morning on the New START nuclear agreement between our two countries, "Russians are mystified. They can't quite believe that the U.S. Senate might fail to ratify the nuclear arms treaty, and they see no good from such an outcome. The list of possible harmful effects they cite encompasses a minefield of global concerns: no more cooperation on Iran, a setback for progressive tendencies in Russia, new hurdles for Russian membership in the World Trade Organization, a terrible example for nuclear countries such as China and India, dim prospects for better NATO relations. And to top it off, the United States and its president would look ridiculous."  America's security and interests should outweigh political positioning at home, and while the president is in Europe promoting American interests, partisan politicians in Washington make achieving this goal much more difficult.

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Military

Obama Responds to 21st Century Threats, With Conservatives Still Fighting the Cold War

Report 18 September 2009
Yesterday President Obama unveiled a plan to deploy proven systems that can defend against short and medium range missiles – the missiles Iran actually possesses – as opposed to wasting a decade and billions of dollars developing Bush’s ground based missile defense system that is intended to counter a threat – long range ballistic missiles - that doesn’t exist.Domestically, the fallout from the Obama administration’s decision has been clarifying. This debate has exposed that while President Obama is seeking to deal with 21st century challenges, conservatives remain firmly focused on those of the 20th.
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Terrorism & National Security

5 Years since Madrid

Report 11 March 2009
Today marks the fifth anniversary of the Madrid train bombings that killed 191-- and exactly seven and a half years since 9/11. To limit the chance that this happens again, we ask what the most important steps are that we can take today, at home and abroad, to keep ourselves safe from terrorism.
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Diplomacy

New Tone Struck At Munich – But Trans-Atlantic Challenges Remain

Report 9 February 2009
This year’s Munich Security Conference saw a change in tone from Americans and Europeans alike, as US leaders pledged to forge a new cooperative relationship and Europeans reciprocated appreciatively.
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Afghanistan

NATO Alliance Struggles in Afghanistan in the Wake of U.S. Neglect and Failed Diplomacy

Report 12 June 2008
Perhaps no theater is as important to NATO’s future as Afghanistan, but bitter disagreement over the war in Iraq, as well as policy choices in Afghanistan, and the resulting backlash in European public opinion, has made it politically difficult for European leaders to increase their commitments.
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